The Science of Hidden Connections

By Kaitlin Vortherms New and exponentially increasing amounts of biomedical research can yield valuable insight into rare diseases, cures, devices, procedures, and more. This growth, however, can sometimes overwhelm scientists and the public alike: the amount of scientific research published in 2014 was more than triple the amount published in 1990, and this trend continues today. While this research has the potential to lead to valuable, lifesaving insights, it is not only hard for scientist

From snorkeling to selfies, here’s how you can advance scientific research

You're in good company We just returned from the 2017 Citizen Science Association conference in St. Paul, MN and we can confirm that citizen science is hot!  Give yourself a pat on the back for being part of this awesome movement! Below, we share some new and alumni projects we think you'll love. Find more projects and events on SciStarter, to do now or bookmark for later. Cheers! The SciStarter Team

X-ray Blast Produces a ‘Molecular Black Hole’

When researchers want to take pictures of very small things, like individual molecules, they have to get creative. When scales shrink to seemingly imperceivable levels, images must be captured using indirect techniques that record how the subject being photographed interacts with its environment. One way to do this is by observing how a beam of particles disperses around the object. Working backward, researchers can then infer what the object in question looks like. Beam Power The parti

How the Chemicals in Sunscreen Protect Our Skin

Kerry Hanson, University of California, Riverside Not so long ago, people like my Aunt Muriel thought of sunburn as a necessary evil on the way to a “good base tan.” She used to slather on the baby oil while using a large reflector to bake away. Aunt Muriel’s mantra when the inevitable burn and peel appeared: Beauty has its price. Was she ever right about that price – but it was a lot higher than any of us at the time recognized. What sun addicts didn’t know then was that we were sett

Tree-Climbing Goats Keep the ‘Desert Gold’ Growing

What do goats and squirrels have in common? They both climb trees, of course. While squirrels live amongst the branches, goats, or at least those in arid regions, climb them for dinner. And that's good for the goats, and the trees. Scientists have discovered that the domesticated goats in southern Morocco benefit the argan trees, Argania spinosa, by spitting out the seeds of the fruits they eat, which helps in seed dispersal. Argan trees play an important role in southern Morocco actin

Egyptian Mummy DNA Reveals the Region’s Rich, Diverse History

DNA recovered from ancient Egyptians mummies is revealing the mosaic of cultures that came to dominate the region. German researchers gathered genetic data from over 100 mummies stored in museum collections and analyzed it with updated sequencing techniques. They amassed 90 mitochondrial DNA sequences and three full genomes, a collection they say comprises the most reliable dataset of ancient Egyptian DNA to date. And their work is beginning to illustrate how the modern-day Egyptian popul

Hacking and Doomsday Top Self-Driving Car Fears Online

Silicon Valley tech giants and Detroit automakers have to convince people to trust self-driving cars before they can sell the futuristic technology to customers. That may prove tricky considering the public's lingering fears and concerns regarding self-driving cars. A recent AI-assisted analysis of more than one trillion social posts revealed that scared-face emoticons related to self-driving cars rose from 30 percent of all emoticons used on the topic to 50 percent by 2016. Top concerns men

Memorial Day Parade 1922: Runaway Tank Kills Veteran

New York City Memorial Day celebrations have featured parades of military hardware almost since the earliest commemorations following the U.S. Civil War. Barely 15 years after that war's end, Union Army veterans from New Jersey marched alongside a battery of rapid-fire Gatling guns in a New York City parade described as being "intended to eclipse all former demonstrations." As World War I loomed just beyond the horizon in 1914, crowds cheered a “wicked looking battery of machine gun troop of

Unattractive People Are Seen As Better Scientists

Good looking, sociable people don't make good scientists, according to popular stereotypes. This is one of the findings of an interesting new study of how scientists are perceived, from British researchers Ana I. Gheorghiu and colleagues. Gheorghiu et al. took 616 pictures of scientists, which they downloaded from the faculty pages at various universities. They gave the portraits to two sets of raters. The first group were asked to rate the attractiveness of the portraits and to say whet

Flashback Friday: There’s no proof that eating your placenta has any health benefits.

Eating your own placenta: some people (many of them celebrities) claim that it is a miracle cure-all, helping a new mother overcome everything from postpartum depression to low milk production. But is there actually any proof to these claims? Not that pro-placentophagers (we just made that word up) will likely care, but according to this meta-analysis of the literature, there is little scientific proof for any of these health claims. More specifically, the authors conclude that "studies inve

Featuring YD Feedwordpress Content Filter Plugin